Advertisement

Strength increases in upper and lower body are larger with longer inter-set rest intervals in trained men

Published:October 08, 2009DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2009.08.002

      Abstract

      The purpose of the current study was to compare different rest interval durations on upper and lower body strength. Thirty-six recreationally trained men were randomly assigned to 1 min (G1; n = 12), 3 min (G3; n = 12) or 5 min (G5; n = 12) rest interval groups. Each group performed the same resistance training program. Maximal strength was assessed at baseline, mid-point (8 weeks) and post-training (16 weeks) for the bench press and leg press exercises. For the bench press, significant increases were demonstrated within G3 and G5 at 8 weeks and at 16 weeks versus baseline (p < 0.05). Additionally, for the bench press, G5 (98.2 ± 3.7 kg) was significantly stronger than G1 (92.5 ± 3.8 kg) at 16 weeks (p < 0.05). For the leg press, significant increases were demonstrated within all groups at 8 weeks and at 16 weeks versus baseline (p < 0.05). Additionally, for the leg press, G5 (290.8 ± 23.5 kg) was significantly stronger than G1 (251.0 ± 15.8 kg) at 8 weeks (p < 0.01) and G3 (305.0 ± 23.9 kg) and G5 (321.7 ± 21.7 kg) were significantly stronger than G1 (276.7 ± 10.7 kg) at 16 weeks (p < 0.05). The findings of the current study indicate that utilising 3 or 5 min rest intervals between sets may result in significantly greater increases in upper and lower body strength beyond the initial weeks of training versus utilising 1-min rest intervals between sets.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • American College of Sports Medicine
        Position stand: progression models in resistance training for healthy adults.
        Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009; 41: 687-708
        • Kraemer W.J.
        • Ratamess N.A.
        Fundamentals of resistance training: progression and exercise prescription.
        Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004; 36: 674-688
        • de Salles B.F.
        • Simão R.
        • Ribeiro F.M.
        • et al.
        Rest interval between sets in strength training.
        Sports Med. 2009; 39: 765-777
        • Willardson J.M.
        A brief review: factors affecting the length of the rest interval between resistance exercise sets.
        J Strength Cond Res. 2006; 20: 978-984
        • Buresh R.
        • Berg K.
        • French J.
        The effect of resistive exercise rest interval on hormonal response, strength, and hypertrophy with training.
        J Strength Cond Res. 2009; 23: 62-71
        • Pincivero D.M.
        • Lephart S.M.
        • Karunakar R.G.
        Effects of rest interval on isokinetic strength and functional performance after short-term high intensity training.
        Br J Sports Med. 1997; 31: 229-234
        • Robinson J.M.
        • Stone M.H.
        • Johnson R.L.
        • et al.
        Effects of different weight training exercise/rest intervals on strength, power, and high intensity exercise endurance.
        J Strength Cond Res. 1995; 9: 216-221
        • Ahtiainen J.P.
        • Pakarinen A.
        • Alen M.
        • et al.
        Short vs. long rest period between the sets in hypertrophic resistance training: influence on muscle strength, size, and hormonal adaptations in trained men.
        J Strength Cond Res. 2005; 19: 572-582
        • Willardson J.M.
        • Burkett L.N.
        The effect of different rest intervals between sets on volume components and strength gains.
        J Strength Cond Res. 2008; 22: 146-152
        • Shephard R.J.
        PAR-Q, Canadian home fitness test and exercise screening alternatives.
        Sports Med. 1988; 5: 185-195
        • Levinger I.
        • Goodman C.
        • Hare D.L.
        • et al.
        The reliability of the 1RM strength test for untrained middle-aged individuals.
        J Sci Med Sport. 2009; 12: 310-316
        • Willardson J.M.
        • Burkett L.N.
        The effect of rest interval length on the sustainability of squat and bench press repetitions.
        J Strength Cond Res. 2006; 20: 396-399
        • Simão R.
        • Polito M.D.
        • Monteiro W.
        Effects of different rest intervals in a resistance training program for trained individuals.
        Braz J Sport Med. 2008; 14: 353-356