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Cytokine profiles and salivary IgA and hormonal responses to an acute bout of strenuous endurance exercise

  • M. Kakanis
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Australia

    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia

    Centre of Excellence for Applied Sport Science Research, Queensland Academy of Sport, Australia
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  • J. Peake
    Affiliations
    School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Australia

    Centre of Excellence for Applied Sport Science Research, Queensland Academy of Sport, Australia
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  • E. Brenu
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Australia

    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia
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  • S. Hooper
    Affiliations
    Centre of Excellence for Applied Sport Science Research, Queensland Academy of Sport, Australia
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  • B. Gray
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Australia
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  • S. Marshall-Gradisnik
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Population Health and Neuroimmunology Unit, Bond University, Australia

    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia
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      Introduction: Strenuous endurance exercise suppresses some immune variables such as T helper (Th) cell activities during the post-exercise recovery period. Changes in the Th1/Th2 response to exercise have been reported previously; however, earlier reports have not investigated cytokine production by phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated Th cells following strenuous endurance exercise. Changes in plasma cortisol and salivary IgA concentrations have been linked to the exercise-induced immunosuppression explained by the ‘open window’ theory. This study measured the production of cytokines by Th1/Th2/Th17 cells, salivary IgA concentration and plasma cortisol concentration for 8 h following an acute bout of strenuous endurance exercise.
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