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Comparison of plantar loads during treadmill and overground running

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Tel.: +86 28 85067040.
    Youlian Hong
    Footnotes
    1 Tel.: +86 28 85067040.
    Affiliations
    Department of Sports Medicine, Chengdu Sports University, Chengdu, China

    Xtep (China) Co., Ltd., Quanzhou, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 Tel.: +852 26096089; fax: +852 26035781.
    Lin Wang
    Footnotes
    2 Tel.: +852 26096089; fax: +852 26035781.
    Affiliations
    School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sports, Shanghai, China

    Department of Sports Science and Physical Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Tel.: +86 28 85067040.
    Jing Xian Li
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 613 562 5800x2457; fax: +1 613 562 5149.
    Footnotes
    1 Tel.: +86 28 85067040.
    Affiliations
    School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sports, Shanghai, China

    School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Tel.: +86 28 85067040.
    Ji He Zhou
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    1 Tel.: +86 28 85067040.
    Affiliations
    Department of Sports Medicine, Chengdu Sports University, Chengdu, China
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Tel.: +86 28 85067040.
    2 Tel.: +852 26096089; fax: +852 26035781.

      Abstract

      Objectives

      The objective of this study is to compare plantar loads during treadmill running and running on concrete and grass surfaces.

      Design

      Crossover study design was used in the study.

      Methods

      A total of 16 experienced heel-to-toe runners participated in the study. Plantar loads data were collected using a Novel Pedar insole sensor system during running on the treadmill, concrete, and grass surfaces at 3.8 m/s running speed and then analyzed.

      Results

      Compared with running on the two other surfaces, treadmill running showed a lower magnitude of maximum plantar pressure and maximum plantar force for the total foot, maximum plantar pressure at two toe regions, and maximum plantar force for the medial forefoot region and two toe regions (p < 0.0017). Treadmill running also showed a longer absolute contact time at two toe regions compared with running on the other two surfaces (p < 0.0017).

      Conclusions

      Treadmill running is associated with a lower magnitude of maximum plantar pressure and a lower maximum plantar force at the plantar areas. These results suggest that the plantar load distribution in treadmill running is not the same as the plantar load distribution in running on overground surfaces. Treadmill running may be useful in early rehabilitation programs. Patients with injuries in their lower extremities may benefit from the reduction in plantar loads. However, the translation to overground running needs investigation.

      Keywords

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