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Editorial Note

        Tim Meyer, Editor in Chief
        In this JSAMS issue, we are publishing an invited editorial from David Hughes and colleagues (
        • Hughes D.C.
        • Orchard J.W.
        • Partridge E.M.
        • et al.
        Return to Exercise Post-COVID-19 infection: A Pragmatic Approach in Mid-2022..
        ). This is not common for our journal but we considered it important to update existing recommendations for return-to-play examinations after Corona virus disease (Covid-19) in a proper speed. New virus variants (more contagious, less pathogenic) and the forthcoming winter of the Southern hemisphere were the most prominent reasons to "push" this message a bit. Nevertheless, the article was subject to critical review of the editors, of course. We are really happy with the result which is very concise and current - and hopefully of great usefulness for practitioners and scientifically interested colleagues alike.
        Two other papers shall be highlighted here in short: Firstly, a large author group around Tyler Kelly investigated the presence of patent foramen ovale in apnea divers vs. control participants (
        • Kelly T.
        • Patrician A.
        • Bryant-Ekstrand M.
        • et al.
        High prevalence of patent foramen ovale in recreational to elite breath hold divers.
        ). Their finding of a larger prevalence in the divers leads to some interesting barophysiological considerations. Frequently, a patent foramen ovale is rather seen as a risk factor for brain embolic events, however, we might get another perspective here. Secondly, a controlled training study in individuals with metabolic syndrome was carried out by Garthwaite and colleagues (
        • Garthwaite T.
        • Sjöros T.
        • Laine S.
        • et al.
        Effects of reduced sedentary time on cardiometabolic health in adults with metabolic syndrome: A three-month randomized controlled trial.
        ). They found promising developments more pronounced in the intervention group than in the control group, particularly with regard to insulin metabolism which is probably one of the key aspects in this patient group. Such training studies are always laborious and sometimes disappointing in their results because sample sizes are limited for practical reasons and intervention times cannot be extended indefinitely. However, they are the most valid approaches delivering us valid estimations of "real-life" training effects and their variability between individuals!

        References

          • Hughes D.C.
          • Orchard J.W.
          • Partridge E.M.
          • et al.
          Return to Exercise Post-COVID-19 infection: A Pragmatic Approach in Mid-2022..
          J Sci Med Sport. 2022; 25: 544-547
          • Kelly T.
          • Patrician A.
          • Bryant-Ekstrand M.
          • et al.
          High prevalence of patent foramen ovale in recreational to elite breath hold divers.
          J Sci Med Sport. 2022; 25: 553-556
          • Garthwaite T.
          • Sjöros T.
          • Laine S.
          • et al.
          Effects of reduced sedentary time on cardiometabolic health in adults with metabolic syndrome: A three-month randomized controlled trial.
          J Sci Med Sport. 2022; 25: 579-585